Prevalence of antibodies to infectious laryngotracheitis virus in poultry in New Zealand

Prevalence of antibodies to infectious laryngotracheitis virus in poultry in New Zealand
Peer reviewed

Abstract

Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute respiratory disease of fowls which was first reported from the U.S.A. by May and Tittsler (1925). Both severe acute forms with high mortality and chronic enzootic forms with low mortality have been described, and the earlier literature was reviewed by Jordan (1966). In New Zealand ILT virus was first isolated in 1957 (Webster, 1959). In this country a respiratory disease associated with tracheal plugs and often leading to asphyxiation for many years had been thought to be due to ILT. Work at this laboratory (Lohr, unpublished) and at the Ruakura Animal Health Laboratory (M. Carter, pers. comm.) has shown that these cases are usually due to fowl pox, although the involvement of other respiratory disease agents, especially infectious bronchitis virus, cannot be excluded. In order to determine the prevalence of ILT in New Zealand this serological survey was undertaken, and the results are shown in the following report.

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