Isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from a bite in a cat from the common tree weta (Hemideina crassidens)

Isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from a bite in a cat from the common tree weta (Hemideina crassidens)
Peer reviewed

Abstract

A nine-month-old, neutered, female, domestic shorthaired cat was presented for veterinary examination because of an infected skin wound on the right front paw. Two weeks before, the cat had been playing with a weta (Hemideina crussidens) and was seen by the owner to have been bitten on the medial aspect of the right front leg near the Vth digit. This area had become swollen and for the two days prior to examination, had been noticed to be discharging pus from around the nail. Examination and treatment: The rectal temperature was 39.5°C. The Vth digit of the right fore leg was swollen and painful and pus could be expressed from around the nail bed. The pus was cultured aerobically and anaerobically and Listeria monocytogenes isolated from a mixed growth. The wound was cleaned, with cetrimide and hibitane and the cat treated with amoxycillin by mouth (50mg b.i.d. for 5 days). There was no improvement after 7 days and the cat was then re-examined because of the severe paronychia. The affected digit was surgically removed…

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