A vesicular dermatitis affecting pig snouts. An important differential diagnosis for infectious vesicular diseases

A vesicular dermatitis affecting pig snouts.  An important differential diagnosis for infectious vesicular diseases
Peer reviewed

Abstract

Plants of the family Umbelliferae, including parsnip, parsley and celery, contain furocoumarins in their leaves. Furocoumarins on the skin become activated by light of wavelengths 440-334 nm and the resulting energy release causes cell damage.  Medical practitioners in horticultural areas like Levin are familiar with the condition in people who handle parsnips. It is known as phytophotodermatitis or percutaneous photosensitization. Connor states that the condition is unknown in livestock. However, during the spring and summer of 1984 and 1985, five instances of acute dermatitis characterized by vesicle formation affecting the snounts of pigs were investigated. Three of the instances investigated occurred on one farm and on each occasion virtually all the pigs in a single pen were affected. Two other instances of ulcerating dermatitis on snouts were reported to have occurred on this property in the previous year. In these instances no vesicles had been noticed. The condition also affected two out of six breeding sows on a second farm and almost all of 24 mixed age pigs at a third piggery…

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