A vesiculo-bullous disease in pigs resembling foot and mouth disease. I. Field cases

A vesiculo-bullous disease in pigs resembling foot and mouth disease. I. Field cases
Peer reviewed

Abstract

Eleven incidents of bullae and vesicles on the snouts and less frequently the feet of white-skinned pigs on seven farms are described. Bullous and vesicular lesions up to 5 cm in diameter and containing clotted gelatinous fluid were located on the dorsal aspect of the snout, behind the flange. Lesions ruptured, became ulcerated, developed scabs and healed within three weeks. There was no transmission to other pigs or ruminants. The condition was associated with contact with green vegetable material containing parsnips (Pustinaca sativa) or celery (Apium graveolens), followed by exposure to periods of extended sunshine. Parsnips and celery are known to contain furocoumarins, potent phototoxic compounds. It is suggested that absorption of furocoumarins on the skin of the snout and feet after contact with parsnips and celery and exposure to ultraviolet light caused the lesions in the cases reported. It is postulated that a similar condition may have been responsible for national foot and mouth disease-scares in pigs at Warkworth and Temuka in New Zealand and at Legana in Tasmania.

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