The effect of oral oxidised copper wire on liver copper in farmed red deer

The effect of oral oxidised copper wire on liver copper in farmed red deer
Peer reviewed

Abstract

Twenty-two weaner red deer stags grazed on a marginally copper-deficient property were used to evaluate the effect on liver copper levels of log oxidised copper wire particles given orally. The deer were assigned to two groups on the basis of pre-trial liver copper levels, and grazed together for the duration of the trial from March to October. Liver biopsies were collected from treated and control deer on six occasions at monthly intervals and were analyzed for copper content. Mean liver copper in the treated group rose from pre-treatment levels of 101.8 µmol/kg to a peak of 849.6 µmol/kg two months after copper administration. Thereafter, levels fell steadily until six months after administration when they averaged 84.8 µmol/kg. The mean liver copper content of untreated deer rose from 102.7 µmol/kg at the commencement of the trial, peaked at 255.3 µmol/kg after two months, fell to 103 µmol/kg one month later and remained low thereafter. The liver copper content in treated deer was significantly higher than for control deer for the duration of the study (p<0.01 for months 14 and 6, p <0.05 for month 5). It is concluded that log oxidised copper wire particles acted to provide adequate liver copper stores for up to five months in deer grazed on a marginally copper-deficient property.

Access to the full text of this article is available:

through another providers website:

If you're a member or subscriber and believe you should have access:

login

Otherwise:

Register for an account

Request new password

The whole of the literary matter of the New Zealand Veterinary Journal is copyright Taylor and Francis, Downloading this article signifies agreement with the terms and conditions of electronic access.