Insemination at the second of two induced oestrous periods in anoestrous dairy cows increases conception rates to first service

Insemination at the second of two induced oestrous periods in anoestrous dairy cows increases conception rates to first service
Peer reviewed

Abstract

AIM: To determine whether mating previously anoestrous cows on their second, rather than first, oestrus post pm-turn could increase conception rates to that service.
METHODS: Cows diagnosed as anovulatory anoestrus were allocated to two groups, starting treatment on Day -17 (OES2) or on Day -7 (OESI) where the date of the planned start of mating = Day 0. All cows were treated with intravaginal progesterone (CIDR device) for 6 days and an injection of 1 mg oestradiol benzoate 24 h after removal of the device. Cows in the OES2 group were also injected with prostaglandin F on Day 0.
RESULTS: During the first 7 days of mating, 61.8% (207/335) and 88.2% (328/372) of cows in the OES2 and OESl groups, respectively, were inseminated on detection of oestrus (p <0.001). Oestrus without ovulation occurred in 1.5% of cows in the OES2 group and 6.2% of cows in the OESl group during this period (p <0.01). Of those cows inseminated in the first week of mating, conception rates were 54.0% in the OES2 group and 45.5% in the OESl group (p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in median interval from start of mating to conception between the two groups (24 and 22 days for OES2 and OESl, respectively, p >0.05).
CONCLUSION: Mating previously anoestrous cows on their second, rather than first oestrus post partum increased conception rates to that service. However, median intervals from start of mating to conception were not altered.
KEY WORDS: Dairy cattle, post-partum anoestrus, reproduction, progesterone treatment.

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