Supplementing treated anoestrous dairy cows with progesterone does not increase conception rates

Supplementing treated anoestrous dairy cows with progesterone does not increase conception rates
Peer reviewed

Abstract

AIM:  To determine whether conception rates of anoestrous dairy cows treated with progesterone and oestradiol benzoate (ODB) could be increased by treating them with additional progesterone following insemination at the induced oestrus.
METHODS:  Cows which had not been detected in oestrus for at least 21 days after calving in 18 herds were confirmed anovulatory anoestrus (AA) by veterinary examination, due to the absence of a detectable corpus luteum in the ovaries. All cows were treated with intra-vaginal progesterone (CIDR insert) for 6 days and injected with 1 mg ODB 24 h after insert removal (Day 0). Only cows which were seen in oestrus on Days 0, 1 or 2 were enrolled in the trial. These cows were either treated with a second CIDR insert on Day 8, for 7 days (P4+; n=422), or remained untreated (Control; n=756). Milk progesterone concentrations were measured in a subset of enrolled cows (n=669) on Day 8 to determine the proportion of cows that ovulated following the induced oestrus.
RESULTS:  Conception rates to first insemination were similar in P4+ and Control cows (40.3% and 37.2%, p=0.59). Of cows which had milk progesterone concentrations measured on Day 8, 78.6% displayed oestrus and ovulated, (range: 53.8% to 94.6% among herds). Of the cows that ovulated, conception rate to first insemination was 46.8% and 43.5% in P4+ and Control cows, respectively (p=0.86).
CONCLUSION: Conception rates to first insemination in AA cows treated with progesterone and ODB were not increased by progesterone supplementation using CIDR inserts following insemination.
KEY WORDS: dairy cattle, postpartum anoestrus, reproduction, progesterone treatment, CIDR insert.

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