Salmonella Brandenburg û emergence of a variant strain on a sheep farm in the South Island of New Zealand

Salmonella Brandenburg û emergence of a variant strain on a sheep farm in the South Island of New Zealand
Peer reviewed

Abstract

Salmonella Brandenburg was initially diagnosed in New Zealand in an aborted ewe from a Merino flock in mid-Canterbury in1996. The following year, the disease occurred on farms in mid-Canterbury and on one farm near Winton in Southland (Bailey1997). Since then, this bacterium has caused widespread abortion and deaths in pregnant ewes in Southland, coastal Otago and south- and mid-Canterbury. In cattle, the same organism has caused diarrhoea and dysentery in calves and adult cattle, and abortions and deaths in first-calving cows and, to a lesser extent, in second-calving and older cows. Salmonella Brandenburg has also caused diarrhoea and fetal deaths in dogs, and diarrhoea and deaths in foals.
The outbreak strain has been extensively studied using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All isolates tested to date have had an indistinguishable molecular pattern with the exception of a single isolate from a sheep-yard dust sample recovered in October 2000 that is the subject of this report. The molecular pattern of the variant strain differed from that of the epidemic strain by the absence of one high molecular weight band and the addition of three lower molecular weight bands…

Access to the full text of this article is available:

through another providers website:

If you're a member or subscriber and believe you should have access:

Login

Otherwise:

Register for an account

Request new password

The whole of the literary matter of the New Zealand Veterinary Journal is copyright Taylor and Francis, Downloading this article signifies agreement with the terms and conditions of electronic access.