Mandibular and sublingual sialocoeles in the dog: A retrospective evaluation of 41 cases, using the ventral approach for treatment

Mandibular and sublingual sialocoeles in the dog: A retrospective evaluation of 41 cases, using the ventral approach for treatment
Peer reviewed

Abstract

AIMS: To review results of the ventral approach for mandibular and sublingual sialoadenectomy for the treatment of sialocoeles associated with the mandibular and sublingual salivary glands in the dog, and to determine rates of recurrence and complication following this procedure. METHODS: Thirty-nine dogs with 41 sialocoeles that underwent surgical intervention were retrospectively evaluated with respect to signalment, aetiology, location of sialocoeles, duration of clinical signs, treatment prior to referral, post-operative use of antibiotics and drains, complications, and recurrence.
RESULTS: The mean age at the time of surgery was 5.1 (SD 3.8) years, and duration of clinical signs 6.6 (SD 10.6) months. Long-term follow-up was available for 31 dogs; the minimum was 8 months and mean 47.7 (SD 25.8) months post-surgery. There was no recurrence of sialocoeles following the ventral approach for mandibular and sublingual sialoadenectomy. Postoperatively, 6/35 (17%) cases developed a seroma at the surgical site. No breed or sex predisposition was determined. The cause of the sialocoele was unknown in 36/41 (88%) cases.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Excellent clinical results were achieved with a low rate of complications using the ventral approach for mandibular and sublingual sialoadenectomy. The ventral approach is recommended to minimise the risk of recurrence of sialocoeles.
KEY WORDS: Salivary mucocoele, sialocoele, recurrence, ventral approach, ranula

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